Laminin

Tonight was our first night of Home Group and we watched a teaching on DVD by Andy Stanley where he talked about how big GOD really is. And in the end told a story about a man who was some medical guy who told him to go home and look up laminin a protein in the human body.

If anyone noticed it is shaped like the cross. GOD is in the BIGGEST of things and the smallest of things. Its funny that a lot of sites (EX: Wikipedia) do not show a picture of laminin or morph the picture. Make you think they do it on purpose. Here is Wikipedia’s description of laminin.

Laminin is a protein found in the extracellular matrix, the sheets of protein that form the substrate of all internal organs also called the basement membrane. It is the major non-collagenous component of the basal lamina, such as those on which cells of an epithelium sit.[1] It has four arms that can bind to four other molecules. The three shorter arms are particularly good at binding to other laminin molecules, which is what makes it so great at forming sheets. The long arm is capable of binding to cells, which helps anchor the actual organs to the membrane.

The laminin protein is made up of three separate parts, called the A, B1, and B2 chains. That gives it a total of six “ends”, which accounts for a lot of its flexibility in connecting up various kinds of molecules. Because of this, scientists who create biomaterials are extremely interested in the whole family of laminins[citation needed]. They are a family of glycoproteins that are an integral part of the structural scaffolding in almost every animal tissue. Laminins are secreted and incorporated into cell-associated extracellular matrices.

Laminin is vital to making sure overall body structures hold together. Improper production of laminin can cause muscles to form improperly, leading to a form of muscular dystrophy. It can also cause progeria.